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EyeTech Optical

IMPORTANT NOTICE
Never open up your equipment in an attempt to alter the wiring or internal components.
Doing so could result in serious injury or death.

Henson 3200, 4000, 3500, 5000, 6000       [click here for user manual]

There are many versions of the Henson 3200 depending on its age and serial number. They all look virtually identical from the outside but inside, they may be completely different.

All models use a PC motherboard, I/O cards, a VGA monitor and floppy disc controller.

The earliest model uses a flash RAM instead of a Hard Drive to hold the program and can usually be identified by the words "DRIVE B" printed next to the floppy disc controller. They are also virtually silent in operation and tend to be very reliable as they have no moving parts and low power consumption.

Later models introduced a Hard drive to store the operating system and the floppy drive is labelled "DRIVE A"

COMMON FAULTS

1. No power to instrument
When you switch on the power switch, the instrument should usually beep and the background lights flash on momentarily. If there is absolutely nothing happening, firstly check the mains power connection at the back of the instrument and then the mains input fuses which are located on the underside of the instrument. Also, with instrument connected to the mains and switched on, check if the printer is getting power. This is if the printer is connected to the mains output at the back of the instrument. If power is getting to the printer but the Henson is completely dead, it is usually caused by a failed power supply. Call for a service visit.

2. Instrument freezes up or switches itself off
If you are using the Henson 3200 and it suddenly freezes up or switches itself off, this is probably the result of a defective power supply. In this case, I would recommend that the instrument is not used again until it is repaired. Using the instrument with a fluctuating power supply may cause damage to the computer parts including the motherboard, hard drive, I/O cards and FDD controller. Most parts can be replaced but if the motherboard is damaged, it is virtually impossible to find replacements and the instrument may be beyond repair. Call us for a service visit.

3. Instrument seems to start but no picture on screen
If the instrument seems to start up correctly but no picture appears on the screen, this may be caused by a failed VGA monitor. Turn the brightness control on the front panel to maximum and check for any light on the screen. Sometimes you will see some illumination on the screen but no writing and sometimes it will be completely dark. In these cases, the monitor will need repair so call us for a service visit.

Alternatively, if there is a glow on the screen but no other activity from the instrument, it may be that the mother board has failed. If this is so, the instrument is beyond economical repair. We cannot tell until it is investigated and this is a rare occurrence.

4. Screen flickers or switches off
A small number of Henson 3200's have a VGA monitor which is liable to switch off or flicker. The screen may come on and off if you bang the top of the instrument. This can be repaired so call us for a service visit.

5. Message when starting "missing operating system" or "insert boot disk"
This is caused when the computer cannot find the hard drive. If this happens try the following:

Firstly look at the floppy disc drive. If it says "DRIVE B", it will probably have a flash RAM and no hard drive so the following will not work. Switch the instrument on and wait for it to start up. Hold down Ctrl, Alt and Delete to restart and as soon as the writing appears on the top of the screen, press the "delete" key a few times to enter BIOS setup. You should see a list which says "Standard CMOS setup", "Advanced CMOS setup" etc with the top line highlighted. If none of the lines are highlighted, press F2. On this list should be a line which says "Auto Detect Hard Disk". Use the Up/Down arrows to select this line and press enter. A message should say auto detection in process and some figures should appear in a line alongside drive C. If this happens correctly, it should ask you to accept parameter for drive C. Type "y" and press enter. Do the same for the D drive although none will be detected. Press "Esc" to return to the main list and then "F10" to save settings followed by "y" and "enter". The instrument should now start. If parameters say "Drive C Not Detected", it may be that the hard drive has failed. New hard drives are not compatible with the old Motherboards but we carry spare ones so call for a service visit.

6. Message when starting "CMOS checksum error"
This usually means the BIOS has failed. Switch the instrument on and wait for it to start up. Hold down Ctrl, Alt and Delete to restart and as soon as the writing appears on the top of the screen, press the "delete" key a few times to enter BIOS setup. You should see a list which says "Standard CMOS setup", "Advanced CMOS setup" etc with the top line highlighted. If none of the lines are highlighted, press F2. Use the Up/Down arrows to highlight "Standard CMOS Setup" and press enter. At the top of the page is the date and time. If the year is shown as 1980 or 1996, it is probably because the battery has failed. If the date says 1980, the battery will almost certainly be a soldered in type so you will need to call us to replace it. These batteries tend to leak when they get old and sometimes do extensive damage to the motherboard so it is important to get it replaced as soon as possible. If the date says 1996, it will probably be a lithium cell which is easier to replace and less likely to leak.

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